http://WWW.HOMEODENT.CO.IN
HOMEODENTMULTISPECIALITYCLINIC 5a798e375d43b0085041055d False 161 17
OK
background image not found
Found results for
'american lingual association'
SURGICAL EXTRACTIONS (WISDOM TOOTH) INR   0 INR  0
-NaN%

SURGICAL EXTRACTIONS (WISDOM TOOTH)

The pain, swelling and discomfort that follows wisdom tooth extraction is a normal part of the healing process. How long is wisdom teeth recovery time? When will you be back to chewing crunchy carrots and apples with ease? Getting Your Teeth Pulled The wisdom teeth, also known as the third molars, are the final set of molars to erupt. Not everyone keeps these teeth, nor are they necessary for having a healthy, beautiful smile. In fact, they can cause harm if they do not come in properly. When these molars come in, usually between the ages of 16 and 20, there may not be enough room left for them to erupt. As a result, they can emerge at an angle, they may crowd the mouth and sometimes they don't fully emerge. This can lead to future oral health problems like infections and pain. The American Dental Association recommends that people have their mouth checked before age 20 to see how the wisdom teeth are erupting and for wisdom teethimpaction while the roots are still developing. If necessary, a dentist or an oral surgeon can remove the final molars in a single outpatient procedure. Tooth extraction is a form of major surgery. While in general anesthesia or local anesthesia options are used to make wisdom teeth removal a more comfortable procedure, pain and discomfort are a part of the process, especially after the anesthesia wears off. After your teeth are pulled, wisdom teeth recovery time begins. Taking Care of Yourself After Surgery After getting your wisdom teeth pulled, you are likely to experience pain and swelling. There may be some bleeding. While your mouth heals, you have to be careful not to dislodge the blood clot or harm your healing gums. You should not consume solid foods, alcohol, coffee, soda or hot beverages in the first few days following your procedure. You shouldn't even brush your teeth for the first day of recovery. According to the offices of practicing oral surgeon Dr. Joseph Arzadon of Arlington, Virginia, typical wisdom teeth recovery time is three to four days, although it can be as long as one week. The length of recovery depends a lot on how badly the wisdom teeth were impacted and how they were erupting. There are plenty of things you can do to make the recovery time easier. Plan on taking it easy for a few days; you can resume your normal activities after the first day in most cases, but for about a week you don't want to do anything that could dislodge the blood clot from where your teeth were removed. For the pain, you can take a prescription pain killer given to you by your oral surgeon or recommended over-the-counter pain relievers. To help with the swelling, place an ice pack over your jaw. The cold helps to reduce the inflammation and ease any discomfort. Your dentist or oral surgeon should instruct you on how to take care of your mouth for the recovery period. You may be told to avoid brushing, spitting, flossing and rinsing for 24 hours. After that, you can gently brush your teeth. Rinse your mouth with salt water frequently to help keep it clean and prevent an infection. Stock up on apple sauce, yogurt, cottage cheese and other soft foods. You want to eat a soft-food diet for the first day or more and then slowly move to semi-soft foods when you are ready. The recovery period can take several days and in some cases there may still be swelling and discomfort for a week or more. Use ice packs, enjoy soft foods and keep your mouth clean with simple salt water. If you notice any unusual symptoms like pus discharge, severe pain or a fever, call your oral surgeon right away. While complications such as an infection are rare, they are possible.

INR 0 INR 0

Availability:True

Pay mode:COD only

view details
ORTHODONTIC LINGUAL BRACES INR   0 INR  0
-NaN%

ORTHODONTIC LINGUAL BRACES

There are so many options available to people who want to get their teeth straightened, but one you may not have thought of is lingual braces. What are lingual braces and how do they differ from the other types of braces? With 4.5 million people in the United States currently wearing braces or some other appliance in pursuit to straighten their teeth and keep their mouth beautiful, it is vital. And it's not just important for kids; of those millions, health insurance company Humana says at least 25 percent of them are adults. What Are Lingual Braces? Lingual braces are placed behind the teeth (by the tongue and palate), rather than in front, and therefore offer a great cosmetic alternative for those who want their teeth straightened, without the braces showing. The process for lingual braces involves taking an impression of the teeth, which is then sent to a dental laboratory and used to create customized brackets. The process takes about six weeks and, once complete, allows the orthodontist to use a specific process to cement the braces onto the back surfaces of your teeth. Like traditional braces, this product works by applying gentle yet continuous pressure on the teeth, to help them slowly shift into proper position. The treatment can take anywhere from 18-36 months, depending on the severity of a patient's overcrowding of teeth or their bite. Braces are definitely worth the investment, but lingual braces have special requirements. Because they're custom made, they cost a bit more and treatment tends to be more involved. One of the biggest factors to consider is the cost of the materials; each tooth has its own installment of brackets and arch wires. With costs of $5,000 or more, find out which type of lingual braces would be most effective for your family. Not all orthodontists offer lingual braces because training and technical expertise are needed. The American Lingual Association of Orthodontists represents orthodontists dedicated to using the lingual braces procedure. Types of Lingual Braces Your choice of brand depends upon the orthodontist and his recommendation, as well as your preference. Regardless of the developer, the oral appliance device works in the same way. The difference is in the design and how the braces are attached and secured on the back of the teeth. Some of the most popular brands are: Incognito iBraces In-Ovation STb Light Lingual System Suresmile Lingual QT Taking Care of Lingual Braces As with any orthodontic appliance, good oral hygiene is essential to ensure that gingivitis or tooth decay don't creep in. Proper dental hygiene should include: Brushing twice a day for at least two minutes. Using a soft round-bristle toothbrush to brush at the gumline and the teeth. Flossing daily (floss threader can also be used) or an interproximal brush (if space between the teeth is present) to remove plaque and food debris between the teeth. Using an oral irrigation device to help flush out food debris around the brackets and teeth. Rinsing with a fluoride rinse to strengthen the teeth. Lingual braces may also irritate the tongue and may cause it to become tender. Using wax against the lower teeth to cover the braces can help alleviate this soreness. Some people find speaking clearly and enunciating more difficult while wearing lingual braces. With enough practice, wearers get used to the feel of the braces on the backs of their teeth, and talking normally is a snap. Ultimately, professional dental cleanings every six months are critical to a patient's health with braces. Daily dental habits such as brushing twice a day and flossing daily will prevent plaque buildup and tooth decay. In addition, using products like Colgate Total Daily Repair toothpaste repairs early teeth and gum damage. Having a great smile is worth the temporary inconvenience and expense of braces. Some people are hesitant to invest in them despite the difference they can make — lingual braces are an answer to this problem. Whether you can see them or not, find out which braces are right for you. After all, a beautiful smile with healthy, straight teeth is absolutely worth the effort!

INR 0 INR 0

Availability:True

Pay mode:COD only

view details
ORTHODONTICS TREATMENT INR   0 INR  0
-NaN%

ORTHODONTICS TREATMENT

Orthodontics Overview Straight teeth and a correct bite reduce the risk of future dental issues and help you to smile more confidently. With straight teeth, you have a better chance of preventing plaque buildup, which often leads to gum disease. You’ll also be able to chew food properly and speak better. Dental Associates offers many orthodontic treatment options, including traditional metal braces, clear ceramic braces, Invisalign trays, lingual archwires, removable appliances, or even partial treatments. We’ll help you to decide which orthodontic treatment is best for you based on the severity of your bite, the degree of dental misalignment and your hopes regarding treatment times and the final results. Whatever orthodontic treatment we determine is best for your individual case, your braces will straighten your teeth, help you bite and chew correctly, improve your appearance, improve your oral health and help you feel better about yourself! Braces for a Misaligned Bite Braces correct a bad bite, also called malocclusion. Types of misaligned bites can be a crossbite, overjet, open bites and other bite issues. Bad bites and crooked teeth are often interrelated, and braces can fix both simultaneously. Even if your teeth appear straight, it’s possible that your jaws may not be properly aligned. In this case, an orthodontist may recommend treatment to prevent future problems such as premature tooth loss, extra wear to tooth enamel, speech and chewing problems, and more severe jaw problems. Jaw or tooth alignment issues can be inherited or caused by an injury, losing baby teeth prematurely or too late, or by thumb sucking. The kind of orthodontic treatment you’ll have depends on what you need to get corrected, what you prefer and what your orthodontist recommends. Below are some of the most common orthodontic treatment options. Traditional metal braces are an orthodontic treatment optionTraditional Metal Braces Traditional braces consist of standard metal brackets. This is the most common type of braces, and they have become much sleeker and more comfortable with recent advancements in technology. With metal braces, you also have the option of adding colored elastic bands to make your braces vibrant, colorful and uniquely yours! Learn more about traditional braces and colorful braces bands. Clear Braces Not all braces brackets have to be metal. If you want your braces to be less noticeable, clear braces may be for you. Clear braces function in the same way as traditional metal braces, but the brackets are made with translucent materials. Learn more about clear braces on our traditional braces page. Invisalign clear braces are an orthodontic treatment optionInvisible Braces Invisalign braces are a clear set of custom-fitted removable trays made with a pliable material that fits snuggly to your teeth. Each new set of Invisalign aligners applies a slight adjustment to your teeth. Since they’re removable, you can take them out while eating, drinking, brushing and flossing, so you can easily maintain good oral health habits. You can also remove them for special occasions. Learn more about Invisalign clear braces. Partial Orthodontic Treatment Not everyone needs a full set of braces. Depending on the case, sometimes just one, two or a few teeth need to be realigned for aesthetic purposes, or to prepare for other dental work such as dental implants, restorations, or periodontics. In these types of cases, an orthodontist may recommend partial orthodontic treatment, also called limited treatment. Because this treatment corrects a more isolated area of the mouth, it usually requires less treatment time and also less hardware. Two-Phase Orthodontic Treatment for Young Children To create a healthy smile for a lifetime, a child’s teeth need to be straight and their jaws need to be aligned properly. It’s beneficial to have an orthodontist examine your child while they still have some of their baby teeth. By age seven, typically enough permanent teeth have emerged to evaluate relationships developing between the teeth, the jaw, and bite patterns for a pediatric dentist to make sure everything in the mouth will continue to develop as it should. If a pediatric dentist or orthodontist determines that early treatment is necessary, it often occurs in two phases. The first phase will begin right away while baby teeth are still present, and the second phase will occur when your child gets older at the time deemed appropriate by your child’s growth and development. At Dental Associates, you’ll experience the benefit of having your child’s orthodontist right down the hall from their pediatric dentist. Your child will receive the most coordinated pediatric dentistry and orthodontic care, all in the same clinic. Early treatment will help prevent larger oral issues later, and thus prevent more invasive orthodontic procedures when the child gets older. Early prevention and intervention makes orthodontic work as a teenager much more comfortable and successful.

INR 0 INR 0

Availability:True

Pay mode:COD only

view details
1
false